The Time Trap Close

retirement

Retirement Lifestyle

The Time Trap Close works best with larger ticket items such as retirement plans, or long-term investments. Your goal with it is to get people to admit they need to take action today to ensure the future of their dreams.

People are funny. That’s because we’re emotional beings. We have big dreams for our futures whether that future is the coming weekend or retirement in 25 years. We envision grand adventures, but few of us invest the time and effort required to make those grand plans a reality. Granted, it’s easier to make things happen for a weekend of fun or entertainment just because of our enthusiasm. It’s a bit harder to get and stay enthusiastic about something that may not happen until a much later stage of life.

Use the following words to help people gain perspective on the need to plan and act today in order to have the tomorrow’s of their dreams. [Read more…]

The Money or Nothing Sales Close

Credit CardOf all the sales closing questions I teach, the “Money or Nothing” sales close works well with long term purchases. By that I mean, that they will enjoy the benefits of the purchase for a long time. These would be for things such as homes, furniture, special vacations, education, vehicles, and so on.

The point of the close is to increase the value of gaining the benefits beyond the perceived value onto the money the buyer would exchange for those benefits. As with all selling and closing strategies, sincerity is critical. You must first truly believe, based on your conversations with the buyer, that your product is good for them. You also must have received some positive feedback from them. They may just be hesitant to make the commitment.

Here is an example of how to help them perceive the value of the benefits as greater than their money:

Carol, from what you’ve told me, you are excited about the benefits you will gain from this product. (Do a brief benefit summary here to build their emotions toward the purchase.) Nearly everything we purchase seems to depreciate in value, doesn’t it? Because of that, we all have to consider the same point when making purchasing decisions. The primary consideration is: Do we want to retain our money, and potentially watch it depreciate in value or do we want to invest some of it now for things we  would enjoy long term?

When you’ve done everything else right leading up to this point: establishing rapport, qualifying, presenting and addressing specific concerns, and determine that you have a good solution for their needs, it becomes your obligation to ask for the business (aka close the sale) in order for them to gain those benefits.

Copyright Tom Hopkins International, Inc.

Learn more ways to ask for the business than clients know how to refuse >>

Closing Strategies, “Not in budget”

When you are working with purchasing agents or heads of households, they will often try to stall you or dismiss you by saying the purchase of your product just isn’t in their budget. For some, it can become reflexive to say that. Rather than let the impersonal budget stand between you and a potential sale, get them to admit who is in charge of the budget. Then, sell the value of your offering over the value of sticking to something that was created before they even knew your benefits were available.  [Read more…]

Sales Close for “I just don’t have the time.”

When someone says they don’t have time for your opportunity, to book a party, or even just to meet with you, with sincerity say, “I understand, Mary. We all have 24 hours in a day, don’t we? Most people work eight hours. Then, they sleep about eight hours. That leaves eight hours every day of what we can call discretionary time. That means, we get to choose how to spend those hours. I like to call it ‘opportunity time.’ What I do with my opportunity time makes all the difference in the amount of success I achieve in my life, don’t you see? A lot of people who take advantage of the benefits our business has to offer only invest a couple of hours a day in the business. They still find that they have plenty of quality time left for family and other obligations. Why not at least consider the potential gain you can get with a relatively small investment of time?”

By asking questions as part of your response to “I just don’t have the time.” you are getting them started agreeing with you. Of course, they’ll agree there are eight hours of discretionary time. It’s simple math. They’ll agree about whatyoudo with your time and once the ‘yes’ momentum is going, more often than not they’ll agree to take a more serious look at your opportunity.

For a free e-book titled, “Helping New People Get Comfortable with Network Marketing,” CLICK HERE.

Copyright Tom Hopkins International, Inc. For reprint permission, contact Judy Slack (judys@tomhopkins.com).

The Two-Party Indecision Close

The Two-Party Indecision Close is to be used when there is more than one decision-maker. In this type of situation, you are likely to run into a situation where one is ready to go ahead and one is not. This may be a husband and wife or it could be two business partners. When you reach what looks like an impasse, use this strategy:

Phraseology: “John and Mary, when two people are involved in making a decision, it’s often impossible to find one simple solution that satisfies both of them. So life then becomes a matter of compromise. Now, the measurement of the decision becomes this: Does it satisfy most of the wants of each of the parties?”

If it does, you’ve just closed the sale. If it doesn’t, you’ll at the very least uncover an area of concern that you haven’t fully addressed. Grab hold of that concern and handle it properly, then go for the close again. Remember, the average sale is not closed until after five closing attempts are made.

This information is copyrighted by Tom Hopkins International, Inc. for reprint permission, contact Judy Slack (judys@tomhopkins.com).

Learn even more closes from Sales Closing for Dummies.

The Inflation Close

As much as we all hate the idea of entering a period of inflation, indicators are showing that there is very likely going to be one in the not-too-distant future. I don’t want you to be caught by surprise or to wonder how to make sales during an inflationary time. The recent Great Recession has been tough enough. Let’s be well-prepared to sell during the projected upcoming inflationary times.

The Inflation Close is used to help people rationalize parting with their money for something that either earns a greater return than the inflation rate (such as certain investments) or to improve their lifestyle with products and services whose investments are likely to increase. [Read more…]

The Alternate of Choice Close

In my sales training, the Alternate of Choice question is usually used to get a date or time commitment to visit with a future client. The Alternate of Choice is a question with two answers — either answer is an agreement. The key is to give two solutions that both lead toward the sale.

Another great use for it is regarding a location for a meeting or to deliver product. By giving two choices, one or the other is usually chosen. This is much better than what happens when you give one choice and the only other option is “no.”

The Alternate of Choice can also be the most simple close you will ever use.

Phraseology: “John, you’re really a whiz with that new software today. Would you prefer to train your staff yourself, or shall we provide the training?”

Either way, he needs to own the software in order to train, doesn’t he? [Read more…]

The Competitive Edge Close

If you’re faced with a client who doesn’t want to make a decision about your product, service, or idea, you can tell a competitive-edge story to help them along. These stories don’t need to be elaborate, and they’re not meant to talk your clients into anything they don’t want or need. The stories just remind clients that they have competitors. So if you’re not telling them anything they don’t already know, what’s the appeal in competitive edge stories? In a word, survival.

“John, remember that many of your competitors are facing the same challenges today that you are. Isn’t it interesting that, when an entire industry is fighting the same forces, some companies do a better job of meeting those challenges than others?

My entire objective here today has been to help provide you with a competitive edge. Gaining a competitive edge, no matter how large or small, makes good business sense, doesn’t it?”

To read all of my closes, get a copy of Sales Closing for Dummies. To listen to them delivered and learn how to write your own, listen to my audio titled, Academy of Master Closing — available in both CD and MP3.

This information is copyrighted by Tom Hopkins International, Inc. for reprint permission, contact Judy Slack (judys@tomhopkins.com).

The “I can get it cheaper” Close

Even if you’re brand new to selling, you will have likely hear this one from clients. Nearly all of them say it. Some may use differenet forms such as wanting to shop around or look for a better bargain but it means the same thing. It’s nothing more than a little sign of fear on the part of the buyer.

Their fear is twofold. One fear is that they’re making a bad decision. The other is that they will part with too much of their money for what they’re gaining in benefits. Either way, they’re telling you that they do want your product. Your job is to calm those emotional fears and help them to rationalize the decision. [Read more…]

The Similar Situation Sales Close

sales clsoeThe Similar Situation Sales Close

Relating a story of someone else who was in a similar situation as the future client is always effective because the client will identify with that person. Tell the future client about someone who procrastinated and wished he/she hadn’t or conversely, someone who didn’t procrastinate and received tremendous benefit from making an immediate buying decision.

Phraseology: “You know, about a month ago, I had a client facing a decision similar to the one you’re considering today. He went ahead with our comprehensive medical plan and had a need to use it just last week. The situation was unfortunate; however, his burden would have been doubled had he not gone ahead with the insurance.”

To read all of my closes, get a copy of Sales Closing for Dummies. To listen to them delivered and learn how to write your own, listen to my audio titled, Academy of Master Closing — available in both CD and MP3.

This information is copyrighted by Tom Hopkins International, Inc. for reprint permission, contact Judy Slack (judys@tomhopkins.com).