When “No” Really Means No Sale

There will be times when “no” really means there’s no sale to be made. It’s just part of selling. As a sales champion, it’s important to recognize a true “non-selling” situation as early as possible during interactions with others. That’s so you don’t waste their time or yours attempting to move forward in the sales process.

On those occasions when the “no” you hear is truly a final one, you still have a sale to make. This new sale is to win the opportunity to stay in touch with these folks. Their circumstances or needs may change in the future. Your goal, now that you’ve connected with them, is to stay top of mind if and when they need your particular product.

To get their permission to say in touch say something like this: “Sue, I understand that now is not the time for you to consider a product like mine. Should things change in the future, though, I’d like to be the one to serve your needs. May I have your permission to stay in touch with you every now and then? I promise not to be a pest. I’d just like to keep you informed of new developments that might be of interest to you.” Your goal, once again, is to keep the opportunity for the sale moving forward. Getting a commitment to revisit a potential client whose “no” means “not now” does just that.

Even in situations where a potential buyer is not going ahead but has interest, ask for referrals. Just because he or she aren’t in a position to purchase your product doesn’t mean they don’t know someone else who is. If people really do like what you’re selling, they’ll be open to suggesting it to others who might be more likely to make a purchase now. It happens all the time, but only when you ask.

Copyright Tom Hopkins International, Inc. Let me help you and your sales team improve the results you’re getting. Share this post with others you know who are in sales. To learn more on this topic, read my book titled, When Buyers Say No.