Selling Real Estate When They Want to See More Homes

It’s bound to happen. You’ll have buyers who are so afraid of making a bad decision that they’ll want to see every home that comes close to meeting their criteria. If you don’t know how to handle this concern, you’ll waste hours of your time and theirs. As a real estate professional, you need to know how to control the sale. You do this by understanding their fears, having empathy for them, and being the expert advisor. Once they learn to rely on your advice, those fears about missing out on the perfect home will dissipate greatly. [Read more…]

The Feel, Felt, Found Strategy

The Feel, Felt, Found technique is an age-tested, proven strategy of moving your customers gently to a new way of thinking. There are three separate parts to Feel, Felt, Found: “I understand how you feel.” This wording lets a customer know that you heard him or her and can relate. “Initially, other (top purchasing agents

The Feel, Felt, Found technique is an age-tested, proven strategy of moving your customers gently to a new way of thinking. There are three separate parts to Feel, Felt, Found:

  • “I understand how you feel.” This wording lets a customer know that you heard him or her and can relate.
  • “Initially, other (top purchasing agents, CEOs, mothers…) felt that way.” You are letting him or her know that this initial thought is common, meaning that the situation can change.
  • “What they found, however, was that after doing ‘X’ was that ‘Y” happened.

‘X’ is what you want your customer to do (purchase your product or put a deposit down now…).

‘Y’ is something positive your customer will receive that he or she cares a great deal about.

This other group of people changed their minds, did what you recommended they do, and were very pleased with the outcome.

Phraseology: “So, Steve… tell me something you would like right now.”

Steve responds, “I want to be as successful as you, Tom.”

“Steve, I understand how you feel. Initially, other ambitious salespeople felt the same way. What they discovered by staying positive and working hard at their craft each day was that they were very pleased with their own success.”

, CEOs, mothers…) felt that way.” You are letting him or her know that this initial thought is common, meaning that the situation can change. “What they found, however, was that after doing ‘X’ was that ‘Y” happened. ‘X’ is what you want your customer to do (purchase your product or put a deposit down now…). ‘Y’ is something positive your customer will receive that he or she cares a great deal about. This other group of people changed their minds, did what you recommended they do, and were very pleased with the outcome. Phraseology: “So, Steve… tell me something you would like right now.” Steve responds, “I want to be as successful as you, Tom.” “Steve, I understand how you feel. Initially, other ambitious salespeople felt the same way. What they discovered by staying positive and working hard at their craft each day was that they were very pleased with their own success.”

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Overcoming the Word “No”

Everyone sells, one way or another. As parents, we sell our children on our belief systems and our values. In courtship, we sell ourselves to our prospective partners. At work, we sell ourselves every day to our employers and our co-workers.

However, there’s something keeping us from doing the best job of selling in every situation. It’s the fear of rejection. And, rejection most often comes in the shape of one of the smallest words in the English language–“no.” Isn’t it amazing how such a small word can have such a huge impact on us? [Read more…]

Objections as Hurdles

Objections are not meant to stop you in your tracks. While you may envision them as brick walls, learn to see yourself hurdling over them. When you really want what’s on the other side (like a closed transaction), you’ll do everything in your power to jump over, tunnel under or take down any walls brick by brick to get there.

Objections are nothing more than your potential client asking you to slow down, clarify a point or educate them better before asking them to make a decision. In many cases a brief summary recap of what you have covered thus far is enough.

In other cases the client will raise a new question or provide you with new information that requires more time and attention. Either way, the sale is still moving forward. It hasn’t been completely blocked. People just won’t waste their time objecting to something they aren’t feeling motivated to own.

Your job is to keep them emotionally involved in the benefits they’ll receive from your product or service. Once they own it emotionally, they (and you) will find plenty of reasons to rationalize the final ownership decision.

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This information is copyrighted by Tom Hopkins International, Inc. for reprint permission, contact Judy Slack (judys@tomhopkins.com).

The Fact-Weighing Scale Approach

Use this close when the people you serve say they want to weigh the facts before deciding whether or not to own your product or service:

“I understand how you feel John, and weighing the facts before making a decision makes a lot of sense. In fact, when I’m in this type of situation, I use a method called the ‘Fact-Weighing Scale Approach.’ Here’s how it works: first, we draw a scale. On the left side of the scale, we pile up, just like small weights, the reasons you feel it makes good sense to go ahead. On the right side of the scale, we pile up the reasons you feel are against it. When we are finished, the decision will be weighed. Let’s try it, ok?”

(Go for a minimum of six reasons for the decision.)

“Now, what are the weights you feel are against the decision?”

(Don’t help on the right side!)

“Let’s see what we’ve got. On the left side of the scale, we have six heavy reasons why you should go ahead. On the right side, we only have two against. So the answer is rather obvious, isn’t it? By the way, I know you will be happy that we took the time to do what you wanted to do, which was to weigh the facts.”

To read all of my closes, get a copy of Sales Closing for Dummies. To listen to them delivered and learn how to write your own, listen to my audio titled, Academy of Master Closing — available in both CD and MP3.

This information is copyrighted by Tom Hopkins International, Inc. for reprint permission, contact Judy Slack (judys@tomhopkins.com).

Uncover Other Options Early

When you’re with a potential new client, it’s wise to know where they’re coming from. Do your best to uncover any other companies or products they’ve investigated before talking with you.

Hopefully, you’re on top of your game and know the features and benefits of your top competitor’s products and how they compare to your own. It’s wonderful when you can compare and contrast your product to that of another company, in effect, allowing your client to ‘shop around’ right there with you rather than going off to talk with a salesperson at another business.

True professionals are not afraid of other companies in the industry. They’re prepared to deal with them. Potential clients will find this approach novel and refreshing as long as you come across truly interested in their best interests…never slamming the competition.

If you’re the expert on the competitor’s products you save the client the mental energy of trying to compare products in their minds while you rattle off the features and options of yours. This tack puts you strongly in the position of being a consultant or expert advisor…someone they can talk openly with about their thoughts on the competition.

Once you know what other product or service they’re considering, you can customize your presentation, highlighting the key elements they’re interested in. When a salesperson responds properly and non-defensively about a competitor’s product, the client will be impressed with both your professionalism and confidence in your own product. This goes a long way toward building your sales volume and referral business.

Learn more on this topic.

This information is copyrighted by Tom Hopkins International, Inc. for reprint permission, contact Judy Slack (judys@tomhopkins.com).

Overcoming the “It costs too much” Sales Objection

If you’ve been in business longer than a week, you’ve probably heard this objection from at least one potential new client: “It just costs too much.” Or, you might have heard it in this way, “I’m really interested but I think I can get it cheaper somewhere else.”

Everyone wants a bargain, but not everyone really believes they can get your product somewhere else for less. And, many who use this line will never invest the time required to shop around for a better price anyway. So, how do you handle this situation? [Read more…]

When Buyers Hesitate

You’ve just invested the last 30 minutes of your day with someone who truly needs your product or service. You feel like you’re on a roll. That your product is truly good for them and they can afford it.

It began when they explained what they were looking for when you first met. They answered all of your questions about their more specific needs. They listened intently to your explanations, watched your demonstration carefully, handled the product, selected colors or sizes that would work for them. Basically, they seemed very involved and moving toward the purchase. Then, the brakes went on. They just stopped. Then, they started hedging, asking questions you had already answered and physically backing away either by sitting back in their chair, crossing their arms or literally leaning or stepping slightly backwards.

What happened? [Read more…]