Close Sales with Leading Questions

Close Sales with Leading QuestionsWhat are Leading Questions

Leading questions are questions that help you steer the conversation to the information that helps you determine if your product is right for your client — these questions guide and convince. Most sales people are tempted to tell their buyers what to believe instead of asking questions that allow the buyers to come up with their own beliefs about the product. The difference is subtle but important.

Here are some examples:

By asking questions rather than spewing facts, figures and details about your products you will engage buyers rather than pushing them away. Gently lead and guide buyers toward your way of thinking by making statements regarding your product or service, then tying them down with tie-down questions such as “isn’t it?” “don’t you agree>” and “wouldn’t you?”

  • The particular shade of blue in this fabric highlights the other colors you’ve chosen, doesn’t it?
  • The latest safety features are vital when considering putting your teen driver behind the wheel on his own, aren’t they?
  • Having a solid financial plan is a wise move when you have a young family to take care of, don’t you agree?

Think about the answers you need to determine if your buyer is qualified to own your product and then craft the questions that will lead the discussion in that direction. No one likes to be asked questions that they don’t know the answers to. Make your buyers feel important and intelligent for speaking with you and you will turn more of them into satisfied clients.

Copyright Tom Hopkins International, Inc. For reprint permission, contact Judy Slack (judys@tomhopkins.com).

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Financial Services Guidelines for Asking Questions

Three Guidelines for Asking Questions

Because asking good questions is such an integral part of good selling I’ve given the matter a lot of study and thought over the years. I’ve boiled down all that knowledge into three basic guidelines.

Guideline #1. Establish a bond before you attempt to control the process with questions. Establishing rapport is essential because people want to do business with people they like and trust. They’ll never get to the trust issue if they don’t like you. There’s no need (or reason) to attempt to become “best buddies” on the spot, but it is important that your prospect comes to like you very early in the process. This is one of the reasons for the brief chit chat that takes place before the selling begins. [Read more…]