Business Productivity Close

business productivity

Business productivity is a great topic to include in your sales presentations. Who doesn’t want their staff members to  be more productive? With some products such as software, increasing productivity is a given–after the learning curve has been completed with training. However, with other products, it may not be so obvious that they’ll positively impact the productivity level of the company.

When you’re marketing products or services to businesses, the decision-maker’s main concern is always going to be the bottom line and whether your product or service makes or saves them money. If your product does not clearly and specifically make or save businesses money, the business-productivity close can help decision-makers view your product from a different perspective — that of having greater job satisfaction among their employees. I developed the business productivity close for products such as company-provided health insurance, retirement programs, and other benefits. It’s also a good one to use with office equipment, fleet vehicles–anything the staff members will use in the course of their jobs.

Here’s a sample of what you might say: Ms. Decision-maker, what I am offering is not just an outstanding product and great service. When you own/implement ________, you’ll also see a boost in employee morale. Haven’t you noticed that anything new increases job interest and excitement in your employees? Excitement increases morale. And, increased morale improves productivity. So, I guess what I’m asking you to consider is, what is an increase in productivity worth to you? 

What happens when you say those words is that the decision-maker starts envisioning their employees with more smiles on their faces, a little lift in their steps, and a general raise in the level of the entire company’s energy for getting things accomplished. Work on including a reference to business productivity in your sales presentations. You’ll be glad you did.

Copyright Tom Hopkins International, Inc.

The Time Trap Close

retirement

Retirement Lifestyle

The Time Trap Close works best with larger ticket items such as retirement plans, or long-term investments. Your goal with it is to get people to admit they need to take action today to ensure the future of their dreams.

People are funny. That’s because we’re emotional beings. We have big dreams for our futures whether that future is the coming weekend or retirement in 25 years. We envision grand adventures, but few of us invest the time and effort required to make those grand plans a reality. Granted, it’s easier to make things happen for a weekend of fun or entertainment just because of our enthusiasm. It’s a bit harder to get and stay enthusiastic about something that may not happen until a much later stage of life.

Use the following words to help people gain perspective on the need to plan and act today in order to have the tomorrow’s of their dreams. [Read more…]

The Money or Nothing Sales Close

Credit CardOf all the sales closing questions I teach, the “Money or Nothing” sales close works well with long term purchases. By that I mean, that they will enjoy the benefits of the purchase for a long time. These would be for things such as homes, furniture, special vacations, education, vehicles, and so on.

The point of the close is to increase the value of gaining the benefits beyond the perceived value onto the money the buyer would exchange for those benefits. As with all selling and closing strategies, sincerity is critical. You must first truly believe, based on your conversations with the buyer, that your product is good for them. You also must have received some positive feedback from them. They may just be hesitant to make the commitment.

Here is an example of how to help them perceive the value of the benefits as greater than their money:

Carol, from what you’ve told me, you are excited about the benefits you will gain from this product. (Do a brief benefit summary here to build their emotions toward the purchase.) Nearly everything we purchase seems to depreciate in value, doesn’t it? Because of that, we all have to consider the same point when making purchasing decisions. The primary consideration is: Do we want to retain our money, and potentially watch it depreciate in value or do we want to invest some of it now for things we  would enjoy long term?

When you’ve done everything else right leading up to this point: establishing rapport, qualifying, presenting and addressing specific concerns, and determine that you have a good solution for their needs, it becomes your obligation to ask for the business (aka close the sale) in order for them to gain those benefits.

Copyright Tom Hopkins International, Inc.

Learn more ways to ask for the business than clients know how to refuse >>