Business Productivity Close

business productivity

Business productivity is a great topic to include in your sales presentations. Who doesn’t want their staff members to  be more productive? With some products such as software, increasing productivity is a given–after the learning curve has been completed with training. However, with other products, it may not be so obvious that they’ll positively impact the productivity level of the company.

When you’re marketing products or services to businesses, the decision-maker’s main concern is always going to be the bottom line and whether your product or service makes or saves them money. If your product does not clearly and specifically make or save businesses money, the business-productivity close can help decision-makers view your product from a different perspective — that of having greater job satisfaction among their employees. I developed the business productivity close for products such as company-provided health insurance, retirement programs, and other benefits. It’s also a good one to use with office equipment, fleet vehicles–anything the staff members will use in the course of their jobs.

Here’s a sample of what you might say: Ms. Decision-maker, what I am offering is not just an outstanding product and great service. When you own/implement ________, you’ll also see a boost in employee morale. Haven’t you noticed that anything new increases job interest and excitement in your employees? Excitement increases morale. And, increased morale improves productivity. So, I guess what I’m asking you to consider is, what is an increase in productivity worth to you? 

What happens when you say those words is that the decision-maker starts envisioning their employees with more smiles on their faces, a little lift in their steps, and a general raise in the level of the entire company’s energy for getting things accomplished. Work on including a reference to business productivity in your sales presentations. You’ll be glad you did.

Copyright Tom Hopkins International, Inc.

What I’m Reading

Leaders are readers. Readers become leaders.

Leaders are readers. Readers become leaders.

I’m often asked what I’m reading. I do my best to read many of the popular business books because my students will ask my opinion of them. If I can’t get to all of those that are relevant to my place in this world, I’ll task my staff to assist me by providing summaries of books.

Also, a common practice among authors is to request endorsements of each other’s works. With those requests come hard bound copies of their books. Some weeks it’s as if the library comes to me!

And, I meet a lot of people in my line of work–many of whom have written books. New authors spread the word about their books by giving a certain number away in their public relations campaigns. I’m fortunate that authors are kind enough to share their books with me, hoping as I read them, I’ll either find some gems to share with my students, or pass their book along to someone who will receive great value from it.

Needless to say there’s never a shortage of something to read in my world!

Today, I thought I’d share with you a few of my more recent favorites. I highly recommend each of these books and know each of the authors either personally or by their actions to be credible sources of information. If these titles are appropriate for you and your business, I recommend that you read them:

  1. Business Without the Bullsh*t by Geoffrey James, an INC columnist I have known for many years
  2. Selling Fearlessly by Robert Terson, one of the most enjoyable reads I’ve ever encountered
  3. How to Get Unstuck by Barry J. Moltz, almost wore out a highlighter on this one
  4. Hire Right, Higher Profits by Lee B. Salz, for managers–excellent strategic advice for hiring

When you read, read for comprehension. Don’t just read quickly through a book to get the gist of what it’s about. Enjoy the journey! Read with a highlighter, and something to take notes on. Treat every non-fiction book as a schoolbook–something to learn from. If you read on an electronic device, take advantage of the highlighters within that software. Then, when you’ve finished the book, re-read just those points you marked.

We are all perpetual students whether we realize it or not. We are learning new things every day. Professionals direct what they learn through choice rather than learning random bits of knowledge the world sends their way each day. Read more…sell more!

Copyright Tom Hopkins International, Inc.

Overcome Buyers’ Remorse

Fear in Real EstateIf you plan on making a career out of selling, you will need to understand and learn how to overcome buyers’ remorse. It’s as natural a part of selling as nearly any other objection or concern.

In some cases, it’s helpful to bring up the potential for an after-the-sale concern early in your presentation. Then, as you give your presentation, you can disable that concern. You may think that’s a risky way of selling, but for some people and some products it’s quite effective.

What causes buyers’ remorse?

  1. Fear that the money spent on your product or service is gone (the fear of loss is stronger than the happiness of gaining the benefits of ownership).
  2. Receiving negative feedback from others when telling of the new purchase such as from friends or relatives.
  3. Logically analyzing the decision — when we all know that purchases are ultimately emotional decisions.

It’s your job to make the new product more valuable to the buyer than keeping the money they invest in it. Actually, that’s your primary job in this wonderful world of selling.

When buyers aren’t confident enough in their decision to stand up to the criticism of others, you may have to re-sell them on the product and the fact that they have different needs and desires than others. As much as people say they want to be individuals, we are all deeply influenced by the opinions of others and want to fit in–somewhere.

When logic is the culprit in the development of buyers’ remorse, you will need to work on strengthening their emotional commitment to the benefits of your product or service–what they get from it; how it makes them feel; how it makes their lives better, easier or safer.

Here are some words to help you understand how you might address a potential case of buyers’ remorse:

You: I can tell that you are excited about your decision to  own this new 72″ TV. It seems that you’re both excited and somewhat relieved to have finally made the decision to receive hours of enjoyment from it.

Them: Oh, yeah. I’m especially looking forward to having friends over to watch the playoffs.

You: That’s great! (pause) You know, from time to time I’ve known people just like you who were so positive about the decision they made until they shared it with a friend or relative. The well-meaning friends or relatives, not understanding all the facts and maybe even being a little envious, responded negatively to the decision. I hope that won’t happen to you and that you’ll be prepared for people who might be jealous of you. Obviously, you’ve done your homework about this and are confident in your decision.

This little bit of preparation and reinforcement about the decision can go a long way to keeping the sale closed and any second-guessing to a minimum.

Note – If there really is a valid potential reason for your buyer to change his or her mind, such as a roommate or spouse who might be very unhappy with the new purchase (even though they assured you during qualification that there was no one else to consult about the decision), you want to learn about it before they take delivery of the product. That way you might be able to help the buyer come up with a reasonable alternative and still make a sale.

Copyright Tom Hopkins International, Inc.